Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Mole News


Cool Heads Needed To Resolve Vexed Questions Around Water
“A royalty implies ownership. That ownership will certainly be contested by iwi and the Govt has never asserted ownership in that way. I think the Labour has just bumbled into it.”

English believes the groundwork had been established to treat Maori claims as “highly localised.” With agreement about regional co-management,

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

GWPF Newsletter: India’s 50-Year Dry Spell Ends As Monsoons Strengthen Over Past 15 Years








Good News Ignored by Global News Media

In this newsletter:

1) India’s 50-Year Dry Spell Ends As Monsoons Strengthen Over Last 15 Years
India New England News, 8 August 2017
 
2) False Alarm: Climate Change Threatens India's Monsoons
The Daily Telegraph, 28 August 2009 

Monday, August 21, 2017

Nicholas Kerr: New Zealand’s reforms and lessons for Washington


This is the text of a speech delivered to the Washington Policy Center monthly breakfast on June 27, 2017.

Many of you may be familiar with New Zealand’s reforms from an economic perspective, so I’m going to spend more of my talk focused on two other areas:
  1. How policies before and after the reforms impacted individuals
  2. How the key players succeeded in implementing the reforms
As a young New Zealander in the period before 1984 and the following decade of reforms, I’ll be speaking from personal experience about their impact. And I’ll be discussing their implementation as the son of an economist who was a key figure in making them come about.

Sunday, August 20, 2017

Frank Newman: Money matters and mediation


Last week was Money Week. I thought every week was money week but apparently we only need to think about money one week of the year and the remainder of the time we can think about the various other causes that have weeks attached to them.

One of the major daily newspapers has been running a series of columns with money tips from our political leaders. I am not sure why one would actually ask a politician for money advice when the government consistently spends more than it earns. It would be more logical to ask for money advice from those who are good at managing money - but then they are not chasing votes and most do not seek publicity.

Seton Motley: Silicon Valley’s ‘News’ Services Bad News for Less Government Everywhere


For decades now, all of America’s major institutions – have been broadly, unquestionably Leftist, and rigidly opposed to any deviance from the entrenched doctrine.

Colleges and universities, Hollywood and entertainment, the Sciences and the News Media – all deeply in Leftism’s thrall.

And then there is the Silicon Valley – now the biggest, baddest, broadest institution of them all. Because of their dominance of the Internet – they have their hands in all of the legacy institutions.

NZCPR Weekly: The Water Debate



Dear NZCPR Reader,   

This week, we look at political manipulation in the debate over fresh water, our NZCPR Guest Commentator Michael Coote examines Maori plans to create a perpetual revenue stream of royalties from commercial water levies, and this week’s poll asks whether you support a charge on the commercial use of water.

And with the election fast approaching, please feel free to forward our newsletters on to others that you believe would be interested in our research and commentary. Anyone is welcome to register for our free weekly newsletter.

*To read the newsletter click HERE.
*To register for the NZCPR Weekly mailing list, click HERE.
 

Friday, August 18, 2017

GWPF Newsletter: U.S. Shale Flooding World Markets








Shale Forever: A Near Infinite Energy Resource?

In this newsletter:

1) U.S. Shale Flooding World Markets: Henry Hub Emerges as Global Natural Gas Benchmark
The Wall Street Journal, 17 August 2017 
 
2) Shale Forever: A Near Infinite Energy Resource?
David Blackmon, Forbes, 17 August 2017 

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Melanie Phillips: How totalitarianism is winning in the west


Credit to the left-leaning Atlantic magazine for running a piece by Peter Beinart, who has actually looked at what is happening in American society and reached an uncomfortable conclusion which would be hard to find elsewhere in the media – and which is all-too pertinent in the wake of Charlottesville.

For Beinart warns that the left is lurching into totalitarianism and violence. “Antifa” purport to be anti-fascist. But they define as fascist anyone they disagree with including mainstream conservatives. Hence their violent suppression of commentators and scholars such as the conservative columnist Ann Coulter, the Breitbart controversialist Milo Yiannopoulos and the political scientist Charles Murray.

Bryan Leyland: Things you know that ain't so - Auckland airport must have rapid transport


Things you know that ain't so - Auckland airport must have rapid transport.

At the moment, the politicians are going all out with promises of rapid transport – Winston Peters favours heavy rail, while Jacinda promises light rail within a few years.

GWPF Newsletter: All Time Record - India Set For Best-Ever Foodgrain Production








Breaking: Drilling Begins At Cuadrilla’s Lancashire Shale Gas Site

In this newsletter:

1) All Time Record: India Set For Best-Ever Foodgrain Production
Times of India, 17 August 2017 
 
2) India’s Foodgrain Output Up 5-Fold In 60 Years
India Spend, August 2017

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

GWPF Newsletter: Global Ocean Cooling Continues








Pruitt: EPA Will Review 'Politicized' Climate Science Report

In this newsletter:

1) Global Ocean Cooling Continues
Science Matters, 10 August 2017 
 
2) Pruitt: EPA Will Review 'Politicized' Climate Science Report
Politico, 11 August 2017 

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

GWPF Newsletter: An Inconvenient Split?








Some Of The World's Largest Non-Polar Glaciers Are Expanding, Despite Global Warming

In this newsletter:

1) An Inconvenient Split?
Paul Matthews, Climate Scepticism, 13 August 2017

2) Some Of The World's Largest Non-Polar Glaciers Are Expanding, Despite Global Warming
Michael Bastasch, Daily Caller, 11 August 2017

Monday, August 14, 2017

Matt Ridley: In its energy policy, Britain keeps picking losers


Shortly before parliament broke up this month, there was a debate on a Lords select committee report on electricity policy that was remarkable for its hard-hitting conclusions. The speakers, and signatories of the report, included a former Labour chancellor, Tory energy secretary, Tory Scottish secretary, cabinet secretary, ambassador to the European Union and Treasury permanent secretary, as well as a bishop, an economics professor, a Labour media tycoon and a Lib Dem who was shortlisted for governor of the Bank of England.

Genuine heavyweights, in short. They were in general agreement: energy policy is a mess, decarbonisation has been pursued at the expense of affordability and, in particular, the nuclear plant at Hinkley Point C in Somerset is an expensive disaster. Their report came out before the devastating National Audit Office report on Hinkley, which said the government had “locked consumers into a risky and expensive project [and] did not consider sufficiently the risks and costs to the consumer”.

Sunday, August 13, 2017

Karl du Fresne: Greens pay the price for one woman's hubris


This was going to be a Turei-free column. Honest. But how can anyone ignore what has been arguably the most tumultuous fortnight in politics since 1984?

My colleague Tom Scott had a cartoon in Wednesday’s paper in which a priest asked a boy: “What has Metiria Turei’s admission of benefit fraud and the Green Party’s subsequent meltdown taught us?”

The boy’s answer: “Never admit to making a mistake even 25 years later.”

That’s a legitimate interpretation of what happened, but my take on it is slightly different.

NZCPR Weekly: Super Policy Under Scrutiny



Dear NZCPR Reader,   

This week, we examine retirement policy, our NZCPR Guest Commentator Michael Littlewood outlines the advantages of our present superannuation system and decries the lack of research and evidence underpinning many policy decisions, and this week’s poll asks whether you would support the retirement age being increased from 65 to 67. 

With Parliament sitting for only one more week before rising for the General Election, this is your last chance to contact Members of Parliament – all MP email addresses can be found on our website HERE.

*To read the newsletter click HERE.
*To register for the NZCPR Weekly mailing list, click HERE.
 

GWPF Newsletter: New York Times Admits Its Frontpage Climate Story Was Wrong








Lord Lawson Blasts Al Gore For Obsession Over Climate

In this newsletter:

1) New York Times Admits Its Frontpage Climate Story Was Wrong
Michael Bastasch, Daily Caller, 9 August 2017

2) Lamar Smith Slams NYT 'False Allegations', 'Fake News' of 'Leaked' Climate Report
CNS News, 9 August 2017 

Saturday, August 12, 2017

GWPF Newsletter: Met Office Accused Of Misleading BBC Audience Over Extreme Weather








BBC Defends Lord Lawson Climate Change Interview

In this newsletter:

1) Met Office Accused Of Misleading BBC Audience Over Extreme Weather Claims
Paul Matthews, Climate Scepticism, 11 August 2017

The BBC asked Peter Stott (Met Office) about extreme events, and specifically storms, but Stott responded by talking about heat waves. What we see here is another example of the self-destructive ‘circling the wagons’ policy. The sceptic has to be attacked, and the warmist defended, even when the IPCC report supports the sceptic.

Frank Newman: Political manias and meltdowns


The election campaign has already brought up its share of extraordinary events: the self-mutilation of the Green Party leadership and the rise of Jacindamania. With those two events the campaign has been transformed as support shifts from NZ First and the Greens to Labour - although based on the latest polling it looks like NZ First will continue to hold the trump card come election night.

In amongst the manias and melt-downs there have been some policy announcements. Prior to the election I will summarise the party policies that particularly affect property investors, but one that is particularly eye-brow raising in a weird way is the announcement by the Opportunities (Gareth Morgan) Party (TOP).

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Karl du Fresne: Shakespeare would have loved it


Greens co-leader James Shaw on Q&A yesterday was saying he was shocked at the hatred for the poor that had been exposed since Metiria Turei went public about her benefit fraud. What bullshit. 

Turei is still being characterised by her admirers as courageous and virtuous. That’s bullshit too. 

She made a calculated and cynical political decision and it backfired spectacularly. While she was gazing down the track at a shimmering city of votes floating like a tantalising mirage in the distance, a 100-tonne locomotive was bearing down on her from behind.

Sunday, August 6, 2017

Mike Butler: The story behind the Titford story


Northland farmer Allan Titford steeled himself on Thursday for a long time locked up when he found out that his appeal against conviction and sentence was rejected. Now, with the appeal over, the other hidden story may be told.

Titford, who was jailed in 2013 for 24 years on 39 charges including the rape of his wife, burning his house down, and assaulting his children, found out about the failure of his appeal from a friend who saw it in a newspaper.

Ron Manners: Australian Native Title Act - this may surprise you!


I posted the following article about the Native Title Act on my website recently and it's a topic that's been generating quite a bit of discussion in the news. Although I reflect on my interactions with the Act and Aboriginal people in the article, as I've charted the Native Title Act process from 1977, it's also a tale of lost opportunities and political correctness.

Have a read for yourself and let me know your opinions on this legislation. Does it surprise you?


To anyone who assumed that the Native Title Act was designed to ‘assist our Aboriginals’, think again. Like most legislation there was much going on behind the scenes that only became obvious after the economic damage was done.

Brian Gaynor: Will Jacinda make the markets take notice?


The general election campaign sprang into life this week with the election of Jacinda Ardern as leader of the Labour Party. Until then it had been a big yawn as far as investment markets were concerned - mainly because of the figures in the accompanying table.

Support for Labour has steadily declined since the 2005 election, and opinion polls were indicating that the left-of-centre party would be no threat to National on September 23.

Labour's recent election peak was 41.3 per cent in 2002, when party leader Helen Clark gave National's Bill English a hiding. The post-election position was Labour with 52 seats, National 27 seats, New Zealand First 13, Act and the Greens with 9 each, United Future 8 and Jim Anderton's Progressive Party with two seats.

Barend Vlaardingerbroek: Ireland and Canada grapple with polygamy


A few weeks ago, the Irish caught up with most of the rest of us when their Supreme Court recognised the first, but not second, marriage of a Lebanese man with two wives whom he had married under Sharia law, which is accepted as legitimate marriage law for Muslims by the Lebanese State.

The recognition of marriages concluded in outside jurisdictions is commonplace worldwide. As a rule of thumb, a jurisdiction will recognise the marriage of a couple where the State authorities of the jurisdiction in which they were married recognises them as being legally married, unless the marriage would have been disallowed in the jurisdiction being applied to. 

Melanie Phillips: Going wherever the evidence leads


At present, a person who wishes to change gender must apply for a Gender Recognition Certificate. This requires a doctor’s diagnosis of gender dysphoria certifying that the individual has spent two years of living in the opposite gender. All that will be needed in future is for a man to say he is now a woman and vice versa for their birth certificate to be changed.

Such a birth certificate will thus be a lie. For whether or not the person should be recognised as having changed sex now, he or she was born a girl or a boy. This Conservative government – conservative! – will thus be putting legalised lying onto the statute book.
This is why the Conservative Party has lost its way.

NZCPR Weekly: A Long Week in Politics



Dear NZCPR Reader,   

This week, we look at the state of politics and the extraordinary events of the last week, our NZCPR Guest Commentator Dr Bryce Edwards outlines the media’s response to the Labour Party’s leadership change, and this week’s poll asks whether you believe the Green Party co-leader Metiria Turei should resign from Parliament.

*To read the newsletter click HERE.
*To register for the NZCPR Weekly mailing list, click HERE.
 

Karl du Fresne: "Progress" has become a matter of what's possible


Some people fret about the threat posed to humanity by climate change. I fret about the threat posed to humanity by technology.

A couple of weeks ago, I used my smartphone to get directions to a motel that I’d booked in Auckland. I only wanted to know how to get there from Queen Street, but of course my phone interpreted the request literally.

Within moments it had mapped out a route all the way from my home in Masterton. It had plotted every turn along the way, precisely calculated the distance (602.2 km), estimated the travel time (7 hours and 25 minutes) and advised me how to avoid the Manawatu Gorge road closure.

Saturday, August 5, 2017

GWPF Newsletter: German Scientists Claim Climate Change Is Cyclical








'Global Cooling Coming Soon'

In this newsletter:

1) German Scientists Claim Climate Change Is Cyclical, Global Cooling Coming Soon
P. Gosselin, No Tricks Zone, 1 August 2017


2) The UK Met Office's Model Muddle
GWPF TV, 3 August 2017

Thursday, August 3, 2017

Mike Butler: Wrecked rivers, iwi demands


Rapid changes in land use leading to polluted water and wrecked rivers have prompted a new book titled Water Quality and Ownership. Author Bill Benfield is a Christchurch architect and vineyard owner who, as a keen angler from an early age, has witnessed the progressive degradation of water quality in rivers and streams.

How has this happened? Benfield goes back to the Muldoon “think big” projects of the early 1980s that produced cheap nitrogen fertiliser from natural gas which enabled greater use of fertiliser.

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Richard Epstein from the US: Presidential Chaos


The Trump White House is in a perpetual state of dysfunction and chaos. Trump kicked off the past week with a series of attacks on Jeff Sessions, his Attorney General and long-time loyalist, for recusing himself from the ongoing investigation of Russia’s interference with the 2016 election. There are tricky arguments, pro and con, on whether Sessions should have removed himself the investigation. But nothing can excuse Trump’s barrage of immature and abusive tweets against a key member of his own team. The upshot is an impasse in which Sessions cannot resign and Trump dare not fire him.

The President followed his Sessions tirade with an ill-considered tweet haphazardly announcing a ban on transgender people serving in the military, which everyone from a blindsided James Mattis on down regarded as a gratuitous insult to many transgender soldiers who have served with distinction. His tweet of course carries no legal consequence, but it puts everyone in government in limbo until the President either issues that foolish order or is, once again, talked off the ledge by his few remaining sensible advisors.

Monday, July 31, 2017

GWPF Newsletter: Europe's Green Utopians Pay Price For Green Energy Folly








Anti-Nuclear, Anti-Coal, Anti-Shale, i.e. Dependent On Russian Gas

In this newsletter:

1) EU Divided Over Russian Gas Dependence & Sanctions 
Stratfor, 25 July 2017

2) Germany’s Green Energy Fiasco Leads To Dependence On Russian Gas
Bloomberg, 4 July 2017

Sunday, July 30, 2017

Green Fascism & Climate-Eugenics








‘Bio-Engineering Humans To Stop Climate Change’

In this newsletter:

1) Climate-Eugenics: ‘Bioengineering Humans To Stop Climate Change’
Tony Thomas, Quadrant, 28 July 2017

2) Michael Crichton: Why Politicized Science is Dangerous
Michael Crichton, State of Fear

Melanie Phillips: The Tory Jacobins


The reason why conservatives on both sides of the Atlantic have lost their way so badly in recent years is that they never understood, and paid scant attention to, the culture wars. In Britain, this has now led some of them to come out as warriors on the wrong side.
Conservatism is not an ideology but an attitude of mind. It involves identifying and holding onto what is most valuable and defending it against erosion or attack. In the 18th century this was embodied in the thinking of Edmund Burke, widely considered to be the philosophical godfather of conservative thought, when he defended freedom and human rights against the barbarism of the French Revolution.

NZCPR Weekly: Democracy Under Attack



Dear NZCPR Reader,   

This week, we look into the extent to which our democracy is under attack, our NZCPR Guest Commentator Anthony Willy reviews the state of democracy in New Zealand, and this week’s poll asks whether you believe New Zealanders are too complacent about the rise of the Maori sovereignty movement.

*To read the newsletter click HERE.
*To register for the NZCPR Weekly mailing list, click HERE.
 

Saturday, July 29, 2017

Guy Benson from the US: Handful of Senate Republicans Join Democrats to Kill 'Skinny Repeal'


In a stunning turn of events early Friday morning, Senate Republicans failed to garner a simple majority for a so-called 'skinny repeal' bill, widely viewed as their last chance to continue the process of repealing and replacing at least some significant elements of Obamacare.  

The final vote was 49-51, with John McCain, Lisa Murkowski and Susan Collins helping Democrats kill the bill -- which leadership insisted was merely a vehicle to get to a conference committee with members of the House of Representatives. 

Friday, July 28, 2017

Frank Newman: Soaring land values


Last week a government research agency, the Social Policy Evaluation and Research Unit, released a report confirming what many have been saying for years. The report is called Quantifying the impact of land use regulation: Evidence from New Zealand and is available online. 

The question it sought to answer was, "What has caused the price of New Zealand houses to soar in recent years?"

The two key points made in the report are: 

Roy Spencer: Study - Sea Level Rise Revised Downward


If I had not looked past the headline of the press report on a new study, I would have just filed it under “It’s worse than we thought”. 

A new study in Nature reported on July 17 carried the following headlines:
“Satellite snafu masked true sea-level rise for decades”
“Revised tallies confirm that the rate of sea-level rise is accelerating as the Earth warms and ice sheets thaw.”
When I read that, I (like everyone else) assumed that corrections to the satellite sea level data since 1993 have now led to a revised trend toward faster (not slower) sea level rise. Right? 

Wrong.

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Matt Ridley: The deep divergence in African genomes


News is dominated by sudden things — bombs, fires, election results — and so gradual news sometimes get left out. The past month has seen three discoveries in Africa that radically change our understanding of a crucial phase in human evolution. For those interested in the common history of all humanity, this should really be among the biggest news of the year.

The first of these discoveries is genetic. Swedish and South African scientists have made the origin of us — modern human beings — an even more mind-bogglingly gradual phenomenon than we used to think. Here is what they found. A skeleton of a boy who died 2,000 years ago at a place called Ballito Bay has yielded a good sample of preserved DNA. He was a Khoe-San, that is to say an indigenous native of southern Africa of the kind once called “bushmen”, who still live in the Kalahari desert.

GWPF Newsletter: UK Government’s Crazy Electric Car Policy Unravels








German States Take Trumpian Climate U-Turn

In this newsletter:

1) UK Government’s Crazy Electric Car Policy Unravels
The Daily Telegraph, 26 July 2017 
 
2) FOI Emails Reveal Obama’s Paris Climate Scheme
The Washington Times, 25 July 2017

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Richard Epstein: The Diversity Fundamentalists


Diversity and inclusion (D&I) is the new catchphrase of today’s elite businesses and universities. Those institutions assume D&I is both a means—to excellence—and an end in itself, making them more closely resemble the larger world of which they are a part. So understood, companies from Facebook to Apple to Goldman Sachs, and academic establishments from UC Berkeley to Harvard to Yale, have found their new holy grail. Their commitment to D&I is all too often treated as a self-evident truth that none should be allowed to question in public discourse. But this new consensus for D&I, if left unchallenged, has an unintended consequence: unthinking intellectual rigidity, a malaise that all successful institutions must guard against.

 The first difficulty with D&I is that it says very little about whom to admit and whom to exclude. Scarcity of places is a major constraint, so any institution committed to D&I has to decide whom to exclude from its community. Ironically, these institutions depend for their success on the institution of private property, which gives them the breathing room on which their cooperative activities rest. 

Kevin Donnelly from Australia: Christian values remain at heart of our culture


There’s no doubt the ABC when falsely accusing Christian men of being more prone to family violence is guilty of a cultural-left bias. And it’s not just the ABC that’s running a secular campaign against Christianity.

Read the Fairfax Press and the impression is that paedophilia mainly involves Catholic priests (ignored is that most children are abused by family or relatives), that Catholic schools don’t deserve government funding and that there’s no place for Christianity in public debates on issues such as abortion and euthanasia.

Gerry Eckhoff: Greens Co-Leader


Casting stones at those who are deemed to have committed indiscretions, minor offenses or crimes in this imperfect world of ours is never a particularly smart move. However, scrutiny is part and parcel for those who seek high office such as a Cabinet Minister and must expect to have their actions - past and present, placed under the spotlight. It is also expected of those who exercise their personal judgment, to be entirely consistent whether they happen to be a judge, a French rugby referee or part of this thing we call “public opinion”.  

The admission of politician Metiria Turei, co-leader of the Greens to having committed benefit fraud 20 odd years ago, is a case in point. The discussion seems to have been carefully developed to excuse and justify Ms Turei’s decision. Ms Turei is seemingly now a victim of her own actions. 

GWPF Newsletter: Why the Greens Lost, and Trump Won








The Great Green Diesel Swindle

In this newsletter:

1) Scott Pruitt May Invite Former Obama Official To Lead A Climate ‘Red Team’
Science Magazine, 24 July 2017
 
2) Joel Kotkin: Why the Greens Lost, and Trump Won
The Daily Beast, 22 July 2017 

Monday, July 24, 2017

GWPF Newsletter: German Carmakers’ Shares Crash On Allegations Of Diesel Collusion








Trump Administration Lining Up Climate Change ‘Red Team’

In this newsletter:

1) Europe’s Green Madness: German Carmakers’ Shares Crash On Allegations Of Diesel Collusion
The Daily Telegraph, 24 July 2017 
 
2) Trump Administration Lining Up Climate Change ‘Red Team’
Washington Examiner, 24 July 2017

Sunday, July 23, 2017

NZCPR Weekly: Major Election Policies Announced



Dear NZCPR Reader,   

This week, we look at two controversial election policy announcements – by the Greens and New Zealand First, our NZCPR Guest Commentator Michael Coote outlines how Winston Peters could become a stabilising coalition force that keeps the extremist Green and Maori Parties out of Government, and this week’s poll asks whether you believe National should re-affirm its policy to abolish the Maori seats.

*To read the newsletter click HERE.
*To register for the NZCPR Weekly mailing list, click HERE.
 

Friday, July 21, 2017

Brian Giesbrecht from Canada: University Succumbs to Politically Correct Nonsense


Why is the university pretending indigenous knowledge and science are the equivalent of our written knowledge base?

I recently listened to an interview of the new head of the University of Manitoba’s Indigenous Knowledge department on CBC radio. She articulately explained that “traditional knowledge” and “indigenous science” have been vital to the survival of the aboriginal culture.

A hunter-gatherer culture depended on information about the movement of animals, weather changes and the medicinal properties of plants, for instance. This important information was passed on orally through many generations, she noted. Because aboriginal culture had no written languages, “keepers” of this knowledge had a special place in the culture.

Nicholas Kerr from the US: Charlie Gard and the need for limited government


A few days after our first child was born, our pediatrician commented at a check-up, “Isn’t it funny that last week you’d never even met Penelope, and now you’d lay down in front of a bus for her?” 

I recalled this as I followed the tragic story of 10-month-old Charlie Gard who suffers from a rare genetic condition. Britain’s National Health Service (NHS) determined that nothing could be done to save him, but his parents wanted to try an experimental treatment in the United States. His doctors did not believe this was in Charlie’s best interests, took the case to court, and won. His parents exhausted all their appeals last week and it appears Charlie will soon be taken off life support.

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Matt Ridley: How the electric car revolution could backfire


The British government is under pressure to follow France and Volvo in promising to set a date by which to ban diesel and petrol engines in cars and replace them with electric motors. It should resist the temptation, not because the ambition is wrong but because coercion could backfire.

The electric motor is older than the internal combustion engine by about half a century. Since taking over factories from the steam piston engine at the end of the 19th century, it has become ubiquitous. Twinned with its opposite number, the turbine (which turns work into electricity, rather than vice versa), it drives machines in factories, opens doors, raises lifts, prepares food, brushes teeth and washes plates.

GWPF Newsletter: The Truth About Green Subsidies








In this newsletter:

1) As Japan Cuts Green Subsidies, Up To 100 Japanese Solar Firms Could Go Bust This Year
PV Tech, 18 July 2017

2) As Green Subsidies Dry Up, Ontario Wind Turbine Factory Closes, Shedding Hundreds Of Jobs
Toronto Sun, 18 July 2017

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

GWPF Newsletter: Will The Sun Put The Brakes On Global Warming?








The Hiatus: One Message For Politicians, Another For Scientists

In this newsletter:

1) Will The Sun Put The Brakes On Global Warming?
Fox News, 16 July 2017
 
2) The Hiatus: One Message For Politicians, Another For Scientists
GWPF Observatory, 17 July 2017 

Brian Arrandale: Immigration Matters - a view point



As an immigrant to New Zealand in the late 1950’s; from being a 10 pound “Pom” happily domiciled in Australia, (finding that a first holiday abroad can lead to very quickly to further immigration, especially so, when it involves the opposite sex)! 

Like many I have mixed feelings regarding immigration, which has been a feature of the developed world since time began. The real question regarding this country and the influx of immigrants is that our infrastructure has lagged well behind. We are unable to cope with this yearly influx at the present rate; and we will continue to fall steadily back and never be able to close this ever widening gap.